11 EARLY WARNING SIGNS SOMEONE YOU LOVE MAY HAVE DEMENTIA (AND HOW TO HELP)

While everyone has forgetful moments, there is a difference between harmless lapses that occur once in a while and memory lapses that indicate something more serious such as dementia.

MEMORY LOSS: WHEN TO WORRY

If changes in your thinking or memory skills are serious enough to be noticed by your family and friends, the odds are, you are suffering from mild cognitive impairment (MCI).  This is a slight decline in cognitive abilities that increase the risk of Alzheimer`s disease, a form of more serious dementia.

If these changes are so severe that they are affecting your ability to function properly, it could be dementia.  For example, if you have difficulties finding the right word or you keep forgetting words and repeat stories during a conversation, there could be something more than a normal day-to-day variety of memory lapses.  Other warning signs of dementia include:

  • Difficulty making choices
  • Exhibiting poor judgment or inappropriate social behaviors
  • Changes in personality or loss of interest in favorite activities
  • Inability to recognize faces or familiar objects
  • Denying a memory problem exists and getting angry when others bring it up
  • Memory lapses that put people in danger, like leaving the stove on
  • Difficulty performing daily tasks like paying bills or taking care of personal hygiene
  • Asking the same question over and over

EARLY WARNING SIGNS OF ALZHEIMER’S

Over 5 million Americans have Alzheimer`s disease, which is constantly on the rise.  In fact, someone in the U.S develops Alzheimer`s every 66 seconds.  It is estimated that the number of affected by this disease will reach 13.8 million people by 2050.

SIGNS OF ALZHEIMER’S/DEMENTIA

  • Inability to manage a budget
  • Poor judgment and decision-making
  • Misplacing things and being unable to retrace steps to find them
  • Losing track of the date or the season
  • Difficulty having a conversation

TYPICAL AGE-RELATED CHANGES

  • Missing a monthly payment
  • Forgetting which day it is and remembering it later
  • Making a bad decision once in a while
  • Sometimes forgetting which word to use
  • Losing things from time to time

IF YOUR MEMORY IS SLIPPING, SWITCH TO A KETOGENIC DIET NOW

A high-fat, moderate-protein and low-net-carb ketogenic diet is very important when it comes to protecting brain health.  It is based on restriction of all but non-starchy vegetable carbs and their replacement with low to moderate protein and high amounts of good fat.  This diet helps convert from carb-burning mode to fat-burning mode, which stimulates the body to produce ketones.

Ketones feed the brain and prevent brain atrophy. They are even capable of restoring neuron and nerve function in the brain after damage has occurred.  Besides a ketogenic diet, coconut oil and its MCTs are is some of the best sources of ketones. According to the British Journal of Nutrition,

“Unlike most other dietary fats that are high in long-chain fatty acids, coconut oilcomprises medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA). MCFA are unique in that they are easily absorbed and metabolised [sic] by the liver, and can be converted to ketones. Ketone bodies are an important alternative energy source in the brain, and may be beneficial to people developing or already with memory impairment, as in Alzheimer‘s disease(AD).”

ADDITIONAL DIETARY STRATEGIES TO HELP PREVENT ALZHEIMER’S

In addition to following a ketogenic diet, the dietary strategies below are also highly recommended:

  • Avoid sugar and refined fructose.
  • Avoid gluten and casein (primarily wheat and pasteurized dairy, but not dairy fat, such as butter).
  • Increase consumption of all healthy fats, including animal-based omega-3.
  • Optimize your gut flora by regularly eating fermented foods

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